Fear is the Anti-Magic (Aflame Post Six)

Posted by: on Aug 17, 2016 | No Comments
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91d75c974e8a8e4cb2e1600a2b3300e7One thing I adore about J.K. Rowling, who wrote the quote that is pictured on the left, is her understanding of love. She understands that if love was magic it would protect a parent’s child from being killed by a curse. And she understands that true love is the choice to act on the light, rather than the darkness. I think she also understands the importance of the shadow. We only have to look at Severus Snape to see how deeply Rowling cherishes his darkness and how he channels it for the good of the world. That is love indeed.

If I’d have understood earlier in my life that love, like magic, can flow in all directions, including towards the self, I’d have been happier far sooner. Thinking of love as magic helps me. Why would you deprive your own life of spells? Why would you only shower others with the gift? Surely performing magic in your own life means you’ll be more capable and able to help others. Love, like magic, isn’t something that should only flow in one direction. Neither does it change one life then fail to touch another. But when you first learn that you can love yourself, it can be scary to do so, especially if you’ve been taught that self-love is selfish.

Fear, however, is the anti-magic. It has a habit of blocking our light.

In Maddie Aflame! (the erotic fantasy series is launching in September), which is humbly┬áconceived as a Harry Potter for readers of erotica — humbly is the word — I really wanted magic to be fueled by love. Maddie’s mother, who visits her as a spirit, teaches her the true nature of magic, while Maddie and her polyamorous friends are trapped in a magical mansion that is being used to experiment on queers. Maddie’s mother tells her:

“Fear is the anti-magic. Fear only creates itself. Love and peace, on the other hand, make magic faster and bigger.”

What Maddie’s mother has truly been trying to teach her, however, is that Maddie is magical. But as a sufferer of Combustion Syndrome, a condition in which she explodes into flames, Maddie can’t see the magic in herself — the magic in her fire.

“Love is magic,” says her mother. “And so my dear are you.”

When Maddie finds out what that truly means, she becomes more powerful than she’d ever imagined.

And, by loving ourselves, my friends, so can we.

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